Events are back, and the podcasting community is pumped!

We’ve had many new podcasters join the ranks in the past year, and for first-timers, these events can be overwhelming (and potentially a little intimidating). Last week we put together an all-star panel on Clubhouse to chat about getting the most out of a podcasting conference¬†(tips/tricks/hacks) and what to expect for both in-person attendance and virtual.

There was so much great information from the panelists, we wanted to share the recording of the session. Also, if you’re looking for an event to attend, here’s a list of the events and conferences we currently know about for the rest of 2021.

Also to note – one spot everyone suggested you go for the deets on podcasting events is James Cridland’s Podnews Newsletter

Moderator: Espree Devora, WeAreLATech

Panelists

Transcript

Espree:

I’m going to break some rules because I always break rules. Just any female in podcasting right now who is not in the She Podcast Facebook group, can you please just go to Facebook and join the She Podcast Facebook group? It is the most amazing resource ever for …

Jessica Kupferman:

Thank you.

Espree:

… podcasters and it is for us lovely women. So, definitely be sure to join that.

Jessica Kupferman:

Thank you. Thank you.

Espree:

With that, kicking it off, this is such an exciting, exciting event, we have today, some of the most elite event organizers in the podcasting industry. It is so awesome. We’re going to fill you in how to make the most of that experience. This is about can’t miss podcast events of 2021. We’re going to make the most of that experience, what events to look for, and we won’t be biased. We won’t just share the ones we know here. We’re all very helpful people. We’re going to share all the ones we know everywhere.

Espree:

And we’re going to talk about what to do when you’re there to make the most of the experience and how to have the best podcasts, because obviously, you go to podcasting events to create a podcast or to find a podcast that you want to sponsor and to know what that looks like. Can you sponsor a podcast if you’re even a small brand? I know Jessica is just a master of all those things too. We are going to get into it. I will do my introduction last. And then, toward maybe the second half or the last, whatever feels organic, we’ll also call you up. So, definitely feel free to raise your hand if you’d like to come up and ask questions. And with that, Jess, tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do.

Jessica Kupferman:

I am Jessica Kupferman. I am one of the co-founders of She Podcasts. I currently am the CEO of She Podcasts. That’s my job at the moment. We, as part of She Podcasts, have a very large support Facebook group, as Espree mentioned. We also do a paid membership and we also do a conference, which is coming up this fall in October in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Jessica Kupferman:

I am originally a branding, marketing, advertising, sponsorship consultant. And I did that for a really long time. And I did web design and graphic design and social media consulting for a really long time until I got a podcast. And then, I started teaching podcasting my way, which is how to grow it basically because I don’t know anything about audio, but I knew how to grow it. And then, I met Elsie and she’s a very perfect complimentary skillset to mine. She knows all about audio and all about voice and technique and all about the tech and stuff like that. Together, we have been teaching for about seven years together almost, which is crazy. And we run all the things together. So, that’s us.

Espree:

You’re awesome. And with that, next up, we have Megan and Oliver united together because without them this experience wouldn’t be possible. Can you share a little bit about Headliner and how Headliner has been the most beneficial thing in my life for marketing my podcasts?

Oliver:

Sure. Thanks, Espree. Headliner is something that I’m one of the co-founders there. We released it a few years ago and it’s one of the easiest ways to create and share little audio-gram and video snippets from your podcasts on social media. And yeah, thanks so much, Espree, for hosting and everyone else for joining.

Espree:

And you guys, I’ve produced over 700 episodes and I’ve created a headliner for every single one of my episodes. It’s the coolest thing ever. And as a special treat in this room exclusively, we get two months free of pro for Headliner. Just go to headliner.app/clubhouse, that’s headliner.app/clubhouse for two months free of pro. It’s exactly what I use. Jay, can you tell us about the amazing things you’ve been doing in the podcasting industry?

Jay Connor:

What up, what up? My name is Jay Connor, co-host of the Extraordinary Negroes, founder of Extraordinary Ideas. And outside of producing shows and producing events that highlight and celebrate podcasters of color, I’m also a journalist. I write about a lot of podcasts that are going on out there. I just basically try to use every talent and skill I have to celebrate and highlight people that are doing dope things within this space.

Espree:

Thank you, Jay. And Dan, you have Podcast Movement. Tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do. Uh oh, Dan, we can’t hear you. We’ll jump over. Oh, there you are. Hey.

Dan:

All right, yeah. Too many fancy set ups going on here, but thanks to the Headliner team for pulling this together and really honored to be on stage with all these great event organizers. I run Podcast Movement. We, at this point, consider ourselves a little bit of a media company. We have the largest daily newsletter in podcasting. We have a really large Facebook group, over 60,000 podcasters in there, which is really awesome. And then, we’re best known for our annual conferences where we bring together thousands of podcasters and [inaudible 00:05:23] and have a week of education, networking and just celebrating what we love, which is podcasting. Yeah, I’m really excited to be here.

Espree:

Awesome. And I just want to welcome Michael, Tim, Elizabeth, Sheila, Mimi, Marissa, Bailey. So excited that you’re joining us and definitely there’s space for you to ask questions. Nathan, I know you’re always championing all the podcast work that I do in Clubhouse. I appreciate you being here too. Andy, go ahead and tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do.

Andy Wong:

Thank you, and I’m very impressed by your 700 headliners. That’s super cool. I think done probably close to 200. But I’m Andy Wong. I am host of the Inspired Money Podcast. I also have a blog called Podcast Jim, where I blog about podcasting and I’m also a co-founder of the Asian-American Podcasters Association. We have about 600 members, Facebook group, website, and we work with the women of color podcasters on Pods On, which is a virtual podcasting event. And one last thing worth mentioning is that the Asian-American Podcasters Association held its first Golden Crane Podcast awards last December. That was a really cool thing to be doing, celebrating with other podcast creators and their shows.

Espree:

Awesome. Thank you so much, Andy. And Rob, legendary, my OG mentor before I became a podcaster. He paved the way to even know how to pick up a mic. Hey, Rob.

Rob:

Hey, it’s great to be here. I appreciate getting invited to do another Headliner Happy Hour. It’s always fun to do these, especially with Espree at the helm here, who’s always fun. It’s great to be here.

Espree:

I know all things you, but go ahead and tell everybody else a little bit about who you are and what you do.

Rob:

Well, I am a long time podcaster. I started podcasting in 2004 with a nationally syndicated radio show that I turned into a podcast. And then I’ve just been working in the industry ever since from companies like Microsoft to X-Box to Podcast One, to [inaudible 00:07:32], to now Libsyn. I’m the VP of content and partnership for Libsyn. I’ve been doing that for about a little over two years now and I’ve been very active in the Clubhouse community. I’ve launched a couple of clubs.

Espree:

In the Clubhouse streets.

Rob:

Yes, exactly. Actually, I’m just in the process right now of launching a Libsyn Pod, which is a Clubhouse community for the Libsyn brands. Hopefully, we can be a resource to Libsyn publishers on the Clubhouse platform. I’m excited to be here.

Espree:

Very cool. And last but not least, one of the guys with the biggest hearts in the world, making global changes, Chris, hi. Tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do.

Chris Krimitsos:

Hey, Espree. Chris Krimitsos here. I am with the team at PodFest. We’re an event that started August 5th, 2013, with 13 people at a meetup and we just kept growing the community. We adopted Tony Shay’s ethos of Holacracy. Our community is our voice and we focus on our creators. And since last year, we’ve been doing online events and just bringing people to the fold, and really amazing to meet creators all over the world due to COVID. It brought us all closer together. Want to just give a shout out to the Headliner team. I actually was just talking to your designer, Max, that was part of designing it. He’s going to be speaking for our next virtual event. I’m excited to be here and excited to have a conversation.

Espree:

And Chris, you broke some records. Can you tell us a little bit about the records that you broke?

Chris Krimitsos:

Yeah, we set a Guinness World Record last summer for largest virtual podcasting event over one week’s time. And then, we did it again in March. And the cool part was not necessarily the record, but we had eight languages spoken and people all over the world. One of my favorite things was we had a young man from Bulgaria teaching and he wasn’t even old enough to drive yet. It was just cool bringing everybody together. And then, Espree, you did an amazing job with your friend honoring Tony Shay’s legacy. That was probably one of my favorite sessions.

Chris Krimitsos:

We had over 520 amazing presenters at that. And right now, we’re in the process of certifying that record with the Guinness World Record for a second time. But the most important part was just bringing everybody together and just hanging out during this trying time of COVID and just keeping positive. And I’m looking forward to the live events that are coming up starting in the summer. It’s an exciting time.

Espree:

One thing that you did that I want to ask Jess about is you used crowdfunding as part of your event, which was interesting because it’s not just crowd funding and it was a way to deeply form relationships with the community. Jess, you did that with She Podcast as well. Can you talk a little bit about your experience unifying community through crowdfunding?

Jessica Kupferman:

[inaudible 00:10:41] I did the event and I wanted to do the event myself, but I wasn’t sure if I would be able to pull it off by myself. And if it was a flop, I was going to be in big trouble. Women in the community had been asking if I had ever thought of doing a conference. So, I thought, “Well, if they really want one, they’ll pay for a ticket before there’s even a schedule or speakers or sponsors or a venue. So, let’s just see what happens.”

Jessica Kupferman:

I throw up a Kickstarter for 25,000, just to see if I could get a little starter money, a little down payment on a little place or something. It wasn’t quick, but we actually raised $50,000 within the timeframe. It was basically a countdown to when the Kickstarter was going to end was us getting to double that money. Yes, the whole group was posting in the group, like, “We’re almost there. 49,995,” kind of thing. It was great to watch so many people rally around making that kind of money and doubling it. It was really special.

Jessica Kupferman:

And you can ask Chris because he was my consultant and my right dude for the first She Podcast live, and every day, I was calling him telling him, “Why didn’t you talk me out of this? This is so much pressure. I should have just done the event. I can’t count on other people to fund it for me. What was I thinking?” I was losing my mind every single day until it was done. But he never wavered. He was like, “No, no, no. This community, they’re going to pay for it for you and it’ll be fine.”

Espree:

And Jess, something I want to dive in a little bit deeper because I think it’s important when thinking about what events are we going to attend, can you share with us your why? Why was this so important to you to launch this event? And it’s a question I’m going to ask Jay to answer as well after. What was your why behind it?

Jessica Kupferman:

Some of it is silly. I’ve been [inaudible 00:12:35] Podcast Movement since the very first Podcast Movement, which has a lot of Podcast Movements. I went every year and then we started going to PodFest every year. And then, we had two podcasts conferences, DC Pod Fest, et cetera. And there’s nothing wrong with any of those events. Those events are always awesome. However, there are little things that a fuss budget like me would notice and I would just keep it in the back of my head.

Jessica Kupferman:

One year, I would go to a conference and be like, “All these t-shirts aren’t in women’s sizes. They’re only a men’s size.” And then, I just put that in my pocket. And then, another time, I went after I had a baby and I think the keynote started at eight in the morning and I was like, “Women get up like this all the time. I just want to sleep. Is there one conference where I could just sleep and not be near my children? That would be amazing.” And I just put that in my pocket.

Jessica Kupferman:

And then, I started noticing, very subtly, there was a year where I did Podcast Movement, PodFest, FinCon, and all of the branding was navy blue and gray. This is a small thing. It’s not like a live or die situation, but as a person who’s a designer and into visuals and aesthetic, I was like, “These things are so cool, but what would it look like if it was pretty? What would it look like if it was feminine? What would it look like if it was luxurious, and not necessarily meant to be branded for all the people, but just our people, because I pay a lot attention to that.”

Jessica Kupferman:

Our branding is very deliberate. The way we have branded the group and all of our stuff, believe it or not. We have it that way for a specific reason. And so, I also started thinking when I’m at these other conferences, this is the thing that really put me over there. The other stuff, I just kept in my pocket. The thing that put me over the edge was this. At every conference, I never felt like I had enough time to hang out with my friends. We would have meetups, Elsie and I, for She Podcast or our super squad. We would sometimes do pre-conferences for just us and we were teaching. But I never felt like I had long. I never had long enough to teach. I never had long enough to [inaudible 00:14:50] and socialize with those women.

Jessica Kupferman:

I thought what I really need is a two-day thing where I can just do this and not the other stuff, not parties and sports bars, not closing parties at … what was that thing that we did, Chris? Is it go-karting? There’s never going to be a woman’s conference where the end party is go-karting. That’s just never going to happen, stuff like that. I just thought, “What would it look like if we didn’t have to cater to everyone? How different would it be, and how much more meaningful would it be to just spend time with these women who are there for us every day, all day long and all the women in that group?” For us to be together and support each other was something I really crave.

Espree:

Totally. And I invited a few people up to ask questions, but before we get into some questions and I want to get into Podcast Movement and the American Asian Podcasters. Andy, how do you call it the American Asian Podcasters Society or group, or what’s the official name?

Andy Wong:

We the Asian American Podcasters Association.

Espree:

Association.

Andy Wong:

It’s very long.

Espree:

Thank you, Andy. And I want to get into all of that. First, Jay, what was your why behind … essentially, you’ve been unifying podcasters of color. Can you tell us a little bit about why that was important and what you’ve done in the space?

Jay Connor:

I think my story, my why, is pretty similar to Jess’. I think the two of us went to a lot of these conferences, these networking events and things of that nature and realized that there … I’m sorry, there’s a siren going on behind me … and realized that there was-

Espree:

That’s because of your events are just that hot to handle.

Jay Connor:

No, but just realized that there’s a lot of times when you go into these spaces and you feel other, you feel like the things that are important to you and your community aren’t necessarily being addressed.

Jessica Kupferman:

Yes, exactly.

Jay Connor:

And I know that for me, whenever I first came into this space, I had real struggles with certain things, challenges, as far as my show was going, connecting with sponsors, collaboration, things of that nature. And I couldn’t find anybody that could actually help me out.

Jay Connor:

… things of that nature, and I couldn’t find anybody that could actually help me out. So my thing was that once I became a successful podcaster, I really wanted to give back to the community and put on free events. So once I got into a position to do so, I made sure that I did that. And thankfully, because of sponsor’s like She Podcasts, which was one of the first sponsors I had for one of my first events, YouTube, Patreon, people like Simple Cast, Castbox, AudioBoom, I was able to make it happen. And I think that it’s not just a matter of addressing a lot of the issues that we face in this space, it’s also a matter of celebrating, and I’m sure Jess would say the same thing, that it’s also a way that we can look at each other and to celebrate each other’s accomplishments. And so for me, that was my why, just really wanted to make sure the podcast was of color, we’re seen and celebrated, and also that the things that were important to us were addressed.

Espree:

Amazing. And I want to take a couple of questions, and then we’re going to get into both Dan and Andy’s events more specifically, but I want… Will is an up and coming podcaster doing phenomenal things in this space. Will, when you’re thinking about what events are can’t miss events of 2021, what comes to mind?

Will:

So first of all, thank you for having me up and for the wonderful, wonderful intro there, Asprey, and as well as just continuing to hold incredible spaces on this platform. There are a couple things that I think about just in terms of what I care about, and what I can get a lot of value out of. So before my podcasting life, I spent a lot of time in software sales and politics, and ended up at a lot of conferences, and by, I don’t know, four, five years into my career, just started to recognize that the value I was getting out of conferences very infrequently had to do with the panels themselves, the discussions of experts up on the stage, partly because I had come to know a lot of those people, and wasn’t consistently impressed by their skills and their ability in the space that I occupied.

Will:

But also mostly because what you really get out of a conference is relationships. What you get out of conferences is what’s happening here. The conversation you have with somebody in the hall, who then you bumped into at the happy hour, who then you exchange business cards, and then you have lunch two days later, that for me was always where the value came from. And as I start thinking about applying some of the ways that I’ve operated in the past podcasts and going forward, what I’m coming to hope is that I continue to prize and value relationships.

Will:

So what, honestly, as I move forward in podcasting, what will be impressive to me, and what I will find valuable at upcoming events is the quality of the people there, people like you Asprey, people whose podcasts I listen to, people I’ve seen do impressive things both in the delivery of their podcasts, outstanding folks who’ve built really just fascinating audio experiences, as well as people are kicking ass on the marketing side. So from my perspective, it’s all about people.

Espree:

Thanks so much, Will, and I think that’s perfect. Dan, you’ve created with Podcast Movement not only the main event, but you’ve created a lot of side events over the years to continue the networking. And just before Dan comments about how to do that, and what he suggests about networking, again, for everybody just joining us, this is can’t miss podcast events of 2021, and Headliner, who this room is thanks to, gave us a special, exclusive treat, two months free of pro. It’s what I use to create all my video trailers for every single episode on my podcast.

Espree:

You just go to headliner.app/clubhouse, and you get two months free of pro. It’s seriously awesome. Like I said earlier, I have over 700 podcast episodes and all of them are promoted with a headliner video trailer. It’s amazing. So Dan, how do you create these networking opportunities? What do you suggest to everybody to really make the most of an event and side events that happen?

Dan:

Yeah. I think when we created podcast movement, that was the idea for the event was just get together the community, and hang out, and get that value like some of the people we’re talking about from the community aspect. And we had about 500 people there that first year in 2014. And it seems like a lot, but really when you spend three or four days with those people, you start to recognize people, and bump into each other, and pick up conversations several days later. And as the event grew, and it grew to 1,000, and then 2,000, then 3,000, and so on, those opportunities become harder to have happen, and less serendipity and all of those things that people like. So that’s when we really started saying, “Okay. Throughout the rest of the year, what can we do?”

Dan:

And we started doing regional one day events where we would go to a city. San Diego was the first one we did. I think you were at that one, Asprey. And we’re like, “Okay, for one day we’re going to segment out this portion of the country, this city of this, this area. And let’s do kind of the same thing we do, but let’s recreate it and do it on a much smaller scale.” And A, it was great because that segment of the podcast movement community could get together, and bump into each other, and have those things, but also there’s so many podcasts around us. You go to the grocery store, there’s podcasters you don’t know, there’s not a shirt you wear or a name badge you wear that says, “I’m a podcaster.” So kind of giving people those opportunities to get together with people that, okay, the event’s over, everyone’s going to go home, but you just met 100, 200 people that live in your town that are podcasters, and hopefully those relationships continue.

Dan:

So we started doing a lot of that on a regional level. We’ve also done several events that are more topic focused, single topic focused, so that, okay, you’re going to bring together a segment of the podcast community and narrow it down that way. But then there’s a lot of value, a lot of us in this group have bigger events or growing events that will get to that point where they’re so big that some of those things won’t happen.

Dan:

So within those events, maybe you have meetups. We have niche focused meetups. Jessica and Elsie with She Podcasts, they’re doing the women’s networking event within Podcast Movement. So there’s things we can do within the large events to kind of segment those people, and let them self identify what they’re interested in, or who they are as podcasters, and then find their tribe, if you will, within those groups or within the events. So that’s kind of some of the things we do.

Espree:

Awesome. Thanks so much. And I want to get into Andy’s Asian American Podcasters Association, but just before that, Chris, just because of something Dan said, what I really admired what you did about this past Podfest is you empowered the community to create their own events. So how as an attendee… There was a lot, Chris. There was a lot of resource everywhere. So as an attendee, how do we manage our time? As the event organizer of Podfest, how would you have suggested someone attending Podfest manage their time so that they can make the most of everything? Because there is a lot of FOMO happening, at least for me.

Chris Krimitsos:

Yeah. We actually, this was the first time that our attendees, some of their tracks had more people than tractor we had. So we were excited that we gave the audience the power to create, but then it was like they were creating up against us. So it was actually fun, because it shows us what we’re lacking. And so what we did, because it’s a virtual event, there’s a community tab in the app we use, Whova, and in Whova the community could set up their own meetups. So we empowered people to say, “Hey, if you see something that we’re not covering it, put it on the meetup, and see if you could help people.” And I think we had over 200 sessions created by the community itself. So FOMO means we’re doing our job. There’s a lot of great things.

Espree:

But how would someone manage their time? How do they know what to go to? What do you recommend to make the most of the experience?

Chris Krimitsos:

Okay. So there’s two things, right? If you’re coming to connect and meet people specific, then you’re going to go to the community tab, and you’re going to go find the groups that are probably your peer groups, where you want to meet and connect. So that’s what I would call being in the hallway and networking virtually, so that’s one. And if you’re looking to learn information, what I would do is I would circle the most important things that you really need to learn. And the one thing I would say is I have a rule when I go to conferences, I only look to pick up one thing that I’m going to implement, because if I implement too many, then I can’t do it all. So I only look for one or two things that stick out that I could implement, and then I implement one thing at a time.

Chris Krimitsos:

And that is one of the challenges when you’re in a place where there’s a lot of great things, focusing on one thing that you could implement, and one thing that you could do well. We do try, Asprey, we do our best in meeting all the speakers and setting the tone that the speakers will be as helpful to the attendees, and the attendees and the sponsors that we’re all one in the same, and everybody is treated really well. Therefore, there’s a lot of connectivity that happens in the chat. So we just create a lot of things behind the scenes to make connections and collisions happen.

Chris Krimitsos:

It seems like it’s happening almost naturally, but it’s all intentional behind the scenes. So pick the most important thing that you have to attend. And then if there’s other things that you can’t, there’s always video passes you can purchase and then review the content later. And if you’re looking to meet people, go into the community tab of a lot of these or the social stream of an app, and see who you could connect with, and start setting up one-to-ones in real time.

Espree:

Amazing. Speaking of one to ones in real time, Chris, you just inspired me because you always lead from such a place of gratitude. And I feel so grateful for Headliner. And I’m not just saying that, they’ve been a part of my podcasting journey for a long time. If you learn something that’s really an amazing golden nugget that you think the podcasting community would benefit over, if you share your learning with the greater community on Twitter, on Instagram, and tag Headliner, I will gift you a private podcasting mentor session with me, not with Headliner. So that would be with me. They’ll let me know that you are tag. You can tag me too if it… Maybe it’s easier, tag them, you don’t have to tag me, but then DM me that you did it, and then I’ll make sure.

Espree:

It’s just special for this room, because I have a lot of gratitude for Headliner. So when you learn that golden nugget that you think the greater community would learn from as well, go ahead, post it, tag Headliner, DM me, and then I’ll just gift you my time, and give you a podcast mentor session. Andy, I really want to get into what you’re doing for the community with the Asian American Podcasters Association. Why was that important to create, and what resources have you been creating for the community?

Andy Wong:

Super good. Well, I think that Will is correct in his valuing networking at these podcasts events, because I actually met my fellow co-founder of the Asian American Podcasters Association, Lee Uehar, at a Podcast Movement networking event that took place in New York City. And it was through that meeting that, probably six months after that, one day I was driving my car around New York City, and Lee texted me on Facebook messenger saying, “Hey, do you think or would you be interested in a Asian American podcasting group?” And the reason why we feel strongly about it, I think like Jessica and… Shoot. I’m forgetting my fellow panelists, Jay. Similar to Jay and Jen and Jessica is that we feel like one thing that we love about podcasting is that the middleman is kind of removed, in that it’s not like radio or not like TV, you’re not selling it to a network.

Andy Wong:

So because of that, most often the biggest obstacle between a future podcaster and their show being out and available for our listeners is ourselves. Because it’s a DIY, as long as you have a microphone, and you can use your phone, you can create a show. And I grew up in a world where I feel like I didn’t see enough people like me on TV, on the big screen, on radio, basically in media. And because podcasting has this low barrier to entry, we wanted to help people empower Asian and Asian American creators to launch their shows, and to amplify their voices, and we’re seeing that, right? We’re seeing Asian and Asian American podcasters who really have diverse shows. It kind of covers all categories from sports to business, to the arts. And we just want to encourage that and have more shows available.

Andy Wong:

So I think it’s just the things that we’ve been doing is… Shout out to Chris Krimitsos, we did have a micro con, which was super cool because we had 14 Asian American speakers that led sessions. So it just blew my mind to see that speaker card with 14 faces that didn’t look like any other podcasts speaker or even conference event that I’ve ever seen before. In addition, we do do Podthon with the Women of Color podcasters. And that came about because we feel like these big podcast conferences, Podcast Movement, Podfest, there’s so many speakers who are pitching great sessions, that many of them do not get accepted. So we started Podthon as a way to take some of those applications that did not get approved, and we felt like there was still great content there.

Andy Wong:

And it gave us the ability to have African American Asian American. Again, a speaker card that looked different from a lot of other conferences. So it’s all about those opportunities. Because as a speaker, I think oftentimes we find that we learn so much when we are teaching ourselves. So I encourage everyone listening, if you have an opportunity to speak, many times you’re kind of reluctant to do so, but don’t hold back. It’s a great chance to get in front of people, hopefully grow your audience, but also learn yourself.

Espree:

And speaking of audience, this room is for you, the audience. And if you want to stay posted on future rooms with Headliner, if you just click on the little house at the top, you’ll be able to follow along. And I want to get to the questions. We have Dawn and Larry, Eby, Marissa. If you have a question, feel free to go ahead to raise your hand, and we’ll call you up. Thank you so much for your patience. Dawn, what question do you have about events in podcasting in 2021?

Dawn:

Hi, thank you so much, Espree.

Espree:

Hi. Of course.

Dawn:

Amazing, amazing room. What’s up, Chris? What’s up, Jessica? Dan-

Speaker 1:

What’s up, Dawn?

Dawn:

I was just feeling the love just really quickly. So much of what you all were saying about what actually happens at these podcasting events. Shout out to Dan for my very first Podcast Movement in San Diego, which was when I was just kind of getting started in the landscape, had a nice long walk with Elsie, which is how I ended up speaking at She Podcasts a couple of years later in Atlanta, which is then how I met Chris, ended up speaking it at Podfest, excuse me.

Espree:

I think what you’re saying, Dawn, by the way is it’s a great example of what Will was talking about before, is it’s really not just about the sessions, it’s about the relationships you create, and then how they end up puzzle piecing together as your journey goes on.

Dawn:

100%, Espree. I could not have predicted that any of these amazing relationships would have happened, or that I would be invited to speak for that matter. So it was just a beautiful, beautiful connection. And so I guess where I’m at now is I host a lot of events for The Moth. I do a lot of work with TED, and TED speakers, and TEDx speakers-

Dawn:

I do a lot of work with TED and TED speakers and TEDx speakers. And so one of the things I’m looking for, for future conferences, is how to use the technology. And going back to Chris’s point about really focusing on one thing per event. Whoo. I can not emphasize that point enough because I know that I really need to be super focused about what am I focusing on now and what can this conference or event do for me, aside from the amazing networking.

Dawn:

So anyways, all that to say that I’m putting on an event, for example, in two weeks with the head of TED’s speaker… Their speaker curator. And one of the things I’ve been looking for is how to actually cross pollinate between Clubhouse, where there’s a lot of people looking for information, and a podcast, and possibly even live streaming. So I know that these are all more like tech issues, but I do know that there’s a lot of fear of podcasters that-

Espree:

Dawn, I think Rob’s your guy to be able to answer that. He’s done live streaming Clubhouse, podcasting. Rob, can you support Dawn in that question?

Rob:

So what, of multitasking and using all these platforms to help build your podcast? Is that what the core question is?

Dawn:

Not necessarily for the podcast per se, but ways of actually cross… Like bringing in a feed from audio, from Clubhouse, knowing that this is… I see that this is recorded, for example.

Rob:

Right.

Dawn:

So bringing in a feed from Clubhouse that could also be live streamed, possibly over Streamyard or whatever other technology.

Rob:

Okay.

Dawn:

Yeah.

Rob:

Yeah. I think you can do it. And I’ve done it with the show that I do, the new media show, and that’s actually been live streamed on the video side for many years across all these platforms. And I did do that through Clubhouse for a while, but I found it kind of a little bit of a technical juggle to pull off, and to do it effectively. It depends on the format of your show, I guess, and what your audience is looking for too. Because sometimes an audience for a show is looking for a certain type of format. And one thing that you get into is, you come into Clubhouse and you do your podcast over here, and it has a different set of expectations around what you should do, right? Versus what maybe you normally did with your podcast.

Rob:

And sometimes it’s hard to blend those things together. And that’s what I found. Was that our audience to the podcast that I’m doing right now is really… Really prefers to hear just the co-host and host, right. Or the cohost talk and share. And occasionally maybe have a guest. But bringing it into Clubhouse, basically opening it up to speakers and other people to participate, it takes the format of the show completely in a different direction, right?

Rob:

The topics are all over the map. It’s hard to really focus the topics because people have different interests and they have questions they want to ask. And so what I find is, it’s probably ideal to create maybe separate events over here in Clubhouse that could be corollary to, so I do my normal podcast, and then I come over here and I create almost like a bonus session, right? Or a bonus…

Rob:

And I can invite the same audience, but maybe it is more like what we’re doing here and less like the format of the podcasts that I do on a live prerecorded on the video side. So, yeah. So that’s my answer. I think you really have to think about the format of what you’re doing and make sure that you’re also able to multitask. Because it’s hard to focus on the content and doing a good job on the content while you’re adjusting knobs and looking at different screens to make sure that volumes are good and all this stuff. Because there can be a lot of variability in that. Hope that answered the question.

Espree:

Thank you. Thank you so much Rob, for supporting Dawn. Dawn, do you feel supported in that answer?

Dawn:

Yeah. It pretty much sounds like… This wouldn’t necessarily just be for a podcast. There’s many things I’m doing with the moth and other organizations.

Rob:

Right.

Dawn:

But yeah, I’m looking to-

Espree:

Dawn, why don’t you do this. Why don’t you shoot a DM to Rob. Rob, are you okay with that?

Rob:

Yeah, no I’m fine with that. Sure. Sure.

Espree:

Okay, cool. Awesome. Yeah, because Dawn genuinely, Rob is your guy on all things technicals. He has helped me so much over the years. Because I want to do a round robin with Jessica, Jay, Dan, and Andy, and Rob, and Chris real quick before we take our next question, because I want to keep the promise of the topic at hand, which is what are the can’t-miss podcast events of 2021? So real quick, Jessica, where do you go to find out what are the best can’t-miss events of podcasting? What is the resource you lean on?

Jessica Kupferman:

That is a hard one. I’m glad that… So Podnews now has an events section of their website, where they kind of put everything on there and you can submit if you’re having an event. So while some people like to put webinars series in there, it’s also a really good place to get information about what podcasting things are happening in person. That’s really the only one that I think of. I think Dave Jackson has one too, but I don’t remember the URL off the top of my head. Maybe Rob, maybe you remember.

Jessica Kupferman:

But yeah. I like to use Podnews, and I often just Google it. Because sometimes there’s stuff out there that hasn’t reached your circle yet, but they’re very popular in their own circle. And so just Googling podcasting event 2021 or 2022 will bring you a lot more information than you expect. Usually, anyway.

Espree:

Are you suggesting people get lost in the interwebs?

Jessica Kupferman:

Well, what I was suggesting… I mean, what I’m suggesting will probably annoy everyone that works at a podcast hosting company. But yeah, there’s a lot of people hosting their own podcast stuff out there. And it’s very interesting to me who positions themselves as an expert and what kind of things they’re hosting. So that’s another way I’m doing a little bit of data aggregation.

Jessica Kupferman:

But yeah, I like to sort of… I just like to sort of see what’s happening out there and where it is. Because you know, even though I like to do my event, I’m only on my second year of doing it, I’ve thought about doing it in other parts of the world, if that’s possible. So I just want to know, is that happening already? Who’s doing it? I’m just kind of… Yeah. Kind of nosy about what’s going on.

Espree:

And Jess, before we jump to Jay, can you just say the URL of your event so everybody could check, stock it out? Yeah.

Jessica Kupferman:

Sure. It’s shepodcasts.com/live.

Espree:

Perfect.

Jessica Kupferman:

But you can just go… Yeah. Thank you. Thank you [inaudible 00:41:05].

Espree:

Yeah, you got it Jess. Jay, how do you know what are the can’t-miss podcasting events?

Jay Connor:

Well, first I check my email because I get pitched a lot of this stuff. But definitely newsletters are a good move. Newsletters like Inside Podcasting, Earbuds Podcast, Collective, there’s a number of really good newsletters. But I mean, I think also ingratiating yourself within the community, befriending other podcasters, befriending the people that are organizers and just kind of keeping abreast of what’s going on. Also, social media is obviously a great way to keep in the loop on certain things, as far as following all of the above people that I mentioned. And just keeping abreast of what’s new and what’s going on.

Espree:

Awesome. Any specific hashtag you think we should follow?

Jay Connor:

Not that I can think of off the top of my head, but maybe just podcasting events or hashtag podcasting events, and then the city that you live in or the city that you would like to attend one in.

Espree:

Totally. And Rob, it looks like you have a recommendation.

Rob:

Well, I was just going to say that I think the Podnews classifieds, as far as the event director, is probably the most comprehensive from the standpoint of looking at events on a global scale. What would be my comment, now granted that there is no perfect resource to give access to all this stuff. Nobody’s really been able to pull it all together.

Espree:

Maybe Headliner will put together a perfect resource of events globally for podcasting.

Rob:

Yeah. And what’s great about the Podnews one is that it also lists Clubhouse sessions too. So if you want to do something over there, I know I recently posted a session that I’m doing over there, and it has this whole functionality that lists it as Clubhouse. So if you have a Clubhouse event for podcasting, you can post it over there too.

Espree:

So Dawn, if you do Clubhouse stuff in the way Rob was recommending, definitely make sure to think of that Podnews.

Espree:

Dan, what resource do you look to to find out what events are going on? And what is your event URL?

Espree:

Oh, Jay. Your event URL, so people can stalk you.

Jay Connor:

Oh, I’m on pause for right now. I’m waiting till COVID settles down, but we can definitely revisit this probably later on this year.

Espree:

Cool. And Dan, your event URL, and what is your main resource to find out what events are going on?

Dan:

Yeah. I hate to be a broken record, but I echo Podnews as well. James curates events where he finds them and then, like everyone else was saying, he lets people put their own in there. So really good way. And I think you can sort it by in-person and virtual as well. So you can find what you’re looking for and you can find out about all of our events at podcastmovement.com. We have an event section there. We’ve got a South-East meetup tour coming up in Atlanta, Birmingham, Memphis, Nashville. In June, outdoor, socially distanced, it’s going to be a good time to see some people in person. And then yeah, our big event in August in Nashville this summer.

Espree:

Amazing. And Andy, how about you? What do you think is the main resource to check and what’s your event URL?

Andy Wong:

Yeah. James Cridland’s Podnews again is a good one. I do like Inside Podcasting as well. I think that if you can… Because there are a lot of main line podcast conferences, but then there are a lot of other conferences that might be marketing conferences. And because podcasting continues to grow, they’re adding podcasting tracks to a lot of events. So I think it is important to search. Use Google and search where you live, because if you can get started locally, that’s the lowest hanging fruit, lowest barrier to entry. And from there, once you’re kind of in that, once you start networking, I think that inevitably, that points you into all the other directions that you can sort of follow that yellow brick road.

Andy Wong:

Oh, and my URL is podthon.com.

Espree:

Can you spell that?

Andy Wong:

Sure. It’s P-O-D-T-H-O-N.com.

Espree:

Perfect. And Chris, you moved to online this year, but you’re moving back to offline. What is your number one resource you think to find out what events in podcasting are going on? And then where can people find out more about Podfest?

Chris:

Yeah, just to echo what Andy just said, I’ll go to Eventbrite to see what’s going on with the events. And then meetup.com. I love Meetup and Eventbrite. So I check those a lot, besides all the other stuff. And thepodcasthost.com has some event listings as well.

Espree:

thepodcasthost.com. So we had Insider Podcasting, The Podcast Host, and Podnews. And I bet Clif has some recommendations to use so I’ll pull up Clif as well. He’ll need to get clued in on what that answer is and what the question is. And Chris, how can people find out more about Podfest?

Chris:

Yeah, just go to podfestexpo.com. We’ll be releasing our dates for later on this year for the in-person, and also next year’s date. So we’re really excited.

Espree:

Awesome. Thank you so much. And Clif, the question was, what is the be… Clif is just legendary in the podcast space. I know that I caught you off guard. What are the best resources to find out what podcast events are going on and worth attending?

Cliff:

Oh, wow. Good question. I would say being involved in other podcast communities, because unfortunately I don’t think there’s a great resource for all conferences. I know people have created and developed what they had hoped to be a go-to place for all the different categories and genres of events. But the thing is, is these events sometimes are held by individuals or a group of people that decide to spin something off, and not everybody knows about these resources. So I would say the number one thing to do is be a part of communities and get into a place like this, where a bunch of podcasters gather. And then what you can do is say, “Hey, what events do you guys know about?” And people will tell you.

Cliff:

Another place is, is you can get inside of the various Facebook groups where other people exist. Now, for example, I see that Dan Franks is in here and they’ve got Podcast Movement, tens of thousands of people who are podcasters in that community. I don’t know if it’s a… You can ask Dan whether or not he would appreciate a question as, “Can you guys tell me what other podcast events are?” My guess is that Dan would more than welcome something like that, just because there are plenty of smaller community, local geographic events.

Cliff:

But the real deal, best place to find them, is to get into podcast communities and ask those questions. And for example, you might be in a group like that. And for example, I live in Northern Kentucky, Cincinnati, Ohio. It could be that somebody here is planning a podcast event here in the Cincinnati area, and maybe not very many people outside of the Cincinnati area even know about it. So unfortunately, without getting into the podcast communities and getting networked into them, you may miss out on some of the opportunities. So that’s my best answer off the top of my head, Esprit.

Espree:

No, I appreciate it, Clif. And I know I caught you off guard. I just want to thank everybody. We’re about to move into more Q and A, and I want to make sure we have actionable tips on how to best optimize our podcasting event experiences coming up here in 2021, especially that we’re kind of this cross online, offline hybrid.

Espree:

And today’s event is powered by Headline. And this is the Headliner happy hour. And Headliner is just a company, I’ve mentioned this a couple of times. First of all, their company culture is phenomenal. I love them. They’ve been so supportive in my podcasting journey, having podcasts, video trailers for every single one of my 700 episodes. And they have a special deal where just exclusively for this room, you have two months free of pro. It’s crazy, at headliner.app/clubhouse. That’s headliner.app/clubhouse.

Espree:

And to stay tuned when Headliner does more mixers, just click on the little house at the top and you could follow the podcast Headliners club. And then you can know when we do more resourceful events like this one.

Espree:

So Larry, Eby, Marissa, Casey, thank you so much for your patience. And Clif, feel free to hang out if you like. I don’t want you to feel like the pressure is on. And Dawn, if you have a followup question after, I’m happy to come circle back to you. So, Larry, what question specifically, do you have about podcasting events of 2021 and how to make the best use of your time? How can we support you?

Larry:

Esprit, I appreciate bringing me up and I got to be honest. I’ve gone through about five different questions since I’ve been on stage. Because they’ve all been answered.

Espree:

Amazing.

Larry:

But that’s a good thing. So this is such a tremendous room and having all the industry leaders here in one room is a great opportunity. As a presenter at several of the last Podfests and some of the other smaller events that are out there, what is it that events look for in a presenter that would give aspiring presenters more of an opportunity to get selected and be able to speak at their event?

Espree:

I love that question. I think it’s so valuable to everybody in the room. Who would like to take that one first? How can someone present themselves to be the person picked to speak in an event?

Cliff:

Well, I can speak for just a moment. I used to be responsible for bringing everybody into what was BlogWorld New Media Expo. And one of the things that I know that I always looked for are people who have engaged audiences. People who are able to attract a crowd in, and they have demonstrated that they have a great amount of influence in their communities. People who are able to do things. For example, people that I looked for when bringing in people into the podcasting track, I wanted to look for those people who go to other conferences because they’re speaking at other events, and when they go-

Cliff:

… differences, because they’re speaking at other events, and when they go to that event, they host a private meetup or a social gathering at our local restaurant or a pub or something like that. Then those people are able to attract 30, 50, 100, 150 people. Those are people who are great people to bring in, because you know that they’re engaging. To be able to attract a community of people like that is pretty powerful.

Cliff:

The other thing to look for is people who are networked really well with one another, people who have great relationships, where you hear their names a lot. So you listen to a podcast and you hear … If you’re subscribed to three or four different podcasts and you hear those three or four podcast hosts consistently mention, let’s just say, a small group of people that you hear the same names mentioned again and again as far as, “Hey, here’s somebody who’s doing something inspiring. Here’s somebody who’s doing something meaningful. This is how so-and-so showed up,” and you hear other people say those same names again, those are the things that I look for, people who are actually impacting and influencing people enough that they’re getting mentions without asking for it. It’s just naturally happening.

Cliff:

Those are things that I wanted, because when you invite somebody to a conference, you want to make sure that you give somebody a stage that everybody feels that their time was well-invested in their sessions, and people who are able to attract that kind of attention and influence in the lives of other people are worthy of a stage. At least that’s the way I did New Media Expo and BlogWorld.

Espree:

Thank you so much, Cliff. Jay, Jessica, Dan, Andy, Chris, any thoughts on how to be chosen as a presenter at an event?

Jessica Kupferman:

I mean, we just went through this process sort of twice. So I have a lot of thoughts about it, if you really want to know, because we had a call for speakers in 2020. About 200 people applied, and then we had to cancel. So we kept those applications and then did another call for speakers last week, got another 200 applications. But luckily, Elsie and I went through the first batch before we asked for the second batch so we could kind of say a little more clearly what’s not going to get you picked. That was much easier. So I’ll see if I can reverse-engineer my answer.

Jessica Kupferman:

So, okay, number one, make sure that your pitch is all about the audience and what they’re going to learn and what they’re going to take away. Do not pitch yourself as, “In this session, you’ll hear my success story and why I created an awesome podcast and how I’m doing amazing now.” That is not usually, at least for us, what we’re looking for. We want to know what the audience is going to take away from your session. Also, as much detail as possible about the session. That isn’t to say I need a novel, but more than three sentences, like, “They’ll learn how to do this, they’ll learn how to do this, and they’ll learn how to do this.” We usually just … “Well, if you can’t bother with the pitch, why would [inaudible 00:54:10]?”

Jessica Kupferman:

Then another thing that we found kind of difficult was pitches that were too broad. So some of the pitches were, “In this session, you’ll learn how to start a podcast, how to grow, and how to monetize.” I mean, each one of those could be and have been full-day conferences. That’s not going to necessarily get you picked. You have to really hone in on one aspect of it. How do you use Instagram? How do you use Clubhouse? How to use a microphone. What is a microphone? Anything specific is much better than the more generic.

Jessica Kupferman:

Then also, I don’t know what kind of criteria other conferences have, but it would be who have you … if you want to be a speaker to find out. For example, our conference has to be a woman or nonbinary speaker. We will not choose men. It’s nothing against them, but there’s lots of other conferences where they can speak at. We want to save our spots for women who maybe aren’t being chosen at those other conferences. Also, we request that you have a recent and updated podcast. So if you had a podcast in 2013 and you did four episodes, even if you’re an expert in something, something, we probably wouldn’t choose you, because we want the audience to be able to relate currently to the speaker and what they’re currently [inaudible 00:55:33] else.

Jessica Kupferman:

I’m trying to think if there’s anything else. I mean, that does cover a lot, I have to say. Just to be thoughtful about your pitch. Oh, also, there’s one person last year who pitched me with a three-sentence pitch and ended up being our keynote. The reason that I’m telling you this is because she assumed that Elsie was reading all of the submissions and knew who she was. But last year, I sort of chose those with some other staff members. So I didn’t know who she was, and so I was like, “Well, once again, this is kind of a no thought put into it kind of pitch,” not realizing that she worked at NPR and has this amazing show, because and Elsie had a relationship. So regardless of who you think you have an in with [inaudible 00:56:18] conference, treat each pitch like you’re total strangers. Put in every link. Make them full links. Don’t make people have to type some stuff in. Make sure they can just click and go to your stuff so they can check you out. Make it as easy for the [inaudible 00:56:35]. That’s my advice.

Espree:

Thanks so much, Jess. I saw Andy, it looked like you may have a contribution as well.

Andy Wong:

I think I was just applauding.

Espree:

Oh, cool.

Andy Wong:

But yeah, that was gold, I think.

Espree:

Awesome. Larry, do you feel supported in that answer?

Larry:

I feel supported. Thank you very much.

Espree:

Amazing. Last up, we have Eby. Again, this has been an event powered by Headliner, who’s amazing. So to get that two months free of Headliner Pro, you just go to headliner.app/clubhouse. Eby, what is your question about podcasting events in 2021? How can we support you?

Eby:

Well, you have supported me beautifully. Hello to my friend Jess, and Espree, I’m just loving your moderating skills-

Espree:

Thanks.

Eby:

… and everybody’s super smart contributions. I wanted to offer you guys some breaking news about a conference.

Espree:

Love it.

Eby:

So I think that this is right up the alley of a lot of your points today about having a focus. I’m actually producing NATPE’s first-ever podcasting meets Hollywood kind of conference, and we’re going to put it on. It’ll be a half-day conference on July 14th, and it’s called Content Cast, because NATPE, which used to be just about the television programming executives team, is really all about curating content and helping shape the future of content across all platforms. So I’m so thrilled that they’re going to now talk about how television and video meets podcasting because of all the crossovers between celebrities who have been on both screens, so to speak. So you heard it here first, and my question is-

Espree:

Wait, Eby. Can you say the title of it one more time? What’s the name of the event again?

Eby:

The name of the event is called Content Cast, and it’s through NATPE, which is N, Nancy, A, T, P, Peter, E, natpe.com. It’s not even on the site yet.

Espree:

Thank you.

Eby:

So you heard it here first. I loved your advice about selecting speakers, everyone who shared some suggestions. I want to ask, given that it is a fairly narrow track and we’re not going to try to boil the ocean and teach you how to podcast, but I am interested in your point of view about what would be a great session at sort of a narrowly focused podcasting conference like that? I know I want to talk about celebrities and bring some on who have navigated both screens and the challenge of kind of porting IP between both and even monetizing a podcast when you’re used to producing TV. But is there anything that you would love to see that would make this a Headliner can’t miss podcast event? By the way, I love Headliner.

Espree:

Yay.

Jessica Kupferman:

Yay.

Espree:

Jessica, Dan, Chris, and DJ, any suggestions on how to make Eby’s session a must-have?

Chris Krimitsos:

Yeah. This is Chris from Podfest. Eby, when you’re doing with celebrities, a lot of times, I would just make sure that the information is pertinent to the crowd, because a lot of times, what’ll happen is it could go sideways, to the celebrity celebrity. So just stick to the logistics of how the behind the scenes work. That’s what people want to know. I would just say the how to behind the scenes, that’s what’s in it for the crowd in that situation, right? How to navigate and how to transition.

Eby:

Yes.

Chris Krimitsos:

The celebrity is the draw, but the big draw is when you have the bullet points underneath the celebrity’s name. “We will be covering the logistics of blah, blah, blah, blah, blah and how they navigated da-da-da and how they were able to do this to this.” That’s where people will be like, “Ooh, okay, celebrity got my attention, but the topic is what I want to show up for.” So that’s just my only logistical promotion. That’s kind of how I promote that.

Eby:

That’s brilliant, Chris. Thank you.

Espree:

It looks like Dan has a contribution as well. Go for it, Dan.

Dan:

Yeah. I think one of the big things, because we’ve done a lot of work with bigger names and celebrities and dealt with agents and things like that and PR reps for the celebrities, and a lot of times, they’ll try to dictate what the topic is. This kind of builds off of what Chris says, but they’ll try to dictate the conversation, dictate the topic, and a little bit more self-serving for who that celebrity is, which, obviously, you want to work with them. But the flip side is you’ve got to, like Chris said, do the content for the attendee or who your desired attendee is. Otherwise, they’re not going to have that satisfaction coming out of the event, and your chances of doing it again, if it’s just some kind of promotional or pitch fest for an upcoming whatever it is that they’re trying to promote, that’s kind of going to sink the ship from the beginning.

Espree:

Amazing. Eby, do you feel supported in those answers?

Eby:

More than you could know.

Espree:

Awesome.

Eby:

Thank you, everyone.

Espree:

You got it. I just want to thank everybody for being a part of this amazing event brought to us by Headliner. Again, it’s two months free for Pro, headliner.app/clubhouse. To stay tuned on more Headliner mixers and resources, just click on the little house at the top. So with that, Jessica, Jay, Dan, Andy, Chris, can you share how everybody could easily connect with you? What is the best way to connect with you if they have questions or just they want to say hello? Jessica, why don’t you go first? Oh, we’ll bounce over to Jay. Jay, how can people connect with you?

Jay:

You can follow me on Twitter. I’m @jayconnor. You can hit me up via email. My email address is on my profile, and you can follow me at theextraordinarynegroes.com or just keep up with everything I’m doing in podcasting as far as promoting it over at The Root.

Espree:

Amazing. Jess?

Jessica Kupferman:

Sorry, sorry. My screen locked.

Espree:

No, it’s okay.

Jessica Kupferman:

That’s never happened to me.

Espree:

It’s okay.

Jessica Kupferman:

I was like, “I can’t” … Yeah, you can find me at jess@shepodcasts.com. I’m Jess Kupferman on all the social thing. go to shepodcasts.com. If you ever want to email Elsie and myself at the same time, just do info@hshepodcasts.com. Thank you so much for doing this, Espree, and for inviting me. This was such fun.

Espree:

Oh my gosh. So it’s only possible because of Meghan and Oliver, so that’s where the kudo goes. Thank you.

Jessica Kupferman:

Thank you guys. Thank you, Headliner. Yay.

Espree:

Dan, how can people connect with you?

Dan:

Yeah. Thanks, Headliner. Been a really awesome and an honor to share the stage with everyone. You can just connect with me dan@podcastmovement.com, and I hope to see some people at our meetup tour or an event in August.

Espree:

Amazing. Chris, how can people connect with you?

Chris Krimitsos:

Yeah. First off, shout-out to Peter Ong in Malaysia and Larry’s gallbladder, which he got removed the other day. You can reach out to me at chris@podfestexpo.com, and Espree, thank you so much, and Headliner for putting this together. Really appreciate it. So chris@podfestexpo.com.

Espree:

Got it. I think Andy is occupied at the moment. Meghan, Oliver, how can people connect with Headliner? Is there a way they can continue the conversation? Any last thoughts for us?

Oliver:

Sure. I just want to say thanks, everyone, for coming. This has been great. If anyone wants to reach Headliner, you can reach me, oliver@headliner.app. That’s dot-A-P-P, or literally you could put anything before @headliner.app, and it will find its way to me, because I get the catch-all emails. So yeah, that’s kind of the best way to reach out.

Espree:

Perfect. Meghan?

Oliver:

Cool.

Meghan:

Same. My email is Meghan, M-E-G-H-A-N, at headliner.app. We’d love to hear from you guys.

Espree:

Andy?

Meghan:

Thank you again for…

Espree:

Oh, of course. Andy, I you’re back. How can people connect with you?

Andy Wong:

Easiest place is podcastgym.com. You can email me at andy@podcastgym.com, and thank you, Espree. Thank you, everybody, for having me on the panel. Great to see all these familiar faces.

Espree:

You got it. As you all know, my name’s Espree Devora, and I just care about elevating you. So if there’s anything I could do for you, just message me, and I will do all that I can to support you in your journey, have an amazing podcasting art form space, all the things. I will see you guys in the next episode. Bye.